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20. Disabled Most Likely to be Victims of Serious Crime

Tash Newsletter
March 2000
Title: The Invisible Victims
Author: Dan Sorensen
158.96.231.221/dmhsearch/dmhquery.asp

Faculty evaluator: Julie Allen, Ph.D.
Student researchers: Jennifer Swift, Natalie Guilbault

Research consistently finds that people with substantial disabilities suffer from violent and other major crime at rates four to ten times higher than that of the general population. Estimates are that around 5 million disabled people are victims of serious crime annually in the United States.

People with substantial disabilities represent at least 10 percent of the population of our country (including, among others, 1.8 percent with developmental disabilities, 5 percent with adult onset brain impairment, and 2.8 percent with severe major mental disorders). An estimated 40 percent of all American families have loved ones or close friends with substantial disabilities. Being disabled is not just being a person with a physical handicap. It also includes people with developmental disabilities (such as mental retardation, epilepsy, etc.), traumatic brain injury, severe major mental disorders, degenerate

  • Guido Gonzalez October 24, 2010

    I would like to have some assistance about how to protect myself better (my website is only my photography site in facebook) I have only one eye and I wear a patch for years. I have been verbally abused in public many times and I don’t know how to stop it without creating a physical confrontation that could lead to me getting arrested. Not matter where I go here in Texas, there is always someone making the stupid remark or a bad jokes about me being a pirate. I have been insulted and make fun for the patch almost on a daily basis to the pint that I do not feel good leaving my house. I feel little anxiety every time I go out and I am having problems on dealing with small disagreements with other non related to my disability but i ma so defensive that I can take the emotions out. I am pretty much carrying my emotions under my sleeve. i don’t want to argue with people all the time to defend myself but I need to do something. I can ignore the daily abuse it is just not emotionally possible when you are being stared at not matter where you at like I am some kinda of monster. People act like they have never seen someone with an eye patch and many times they don’t even reprimand their kids when they go over board and start screaming when they seem me: ” Look mom it’s a pirate, it’s a pirate” What happens to him” Some times mother even ask me with complete disregard for my privacy what happen to me. People do not understand that having to deal with hundred maybe even thousands of people during a year this really affect you. I am 44 years old and I lost my eye when I was 3. I was bullied and attacked physically when I was a child. Do i have any options how to protect me??? Please help

  • Superwoolfy September 28, 2011

    wow I never knew that before. What is it about us disabled that people pick us out? It it just easier to to hurt the ‘weak’. Guido I understand where you are coming from. I am a young woman with fibromyalgia. To outsiders I look perfectly healthy yet, I have chronic pain. I have a parking pass wich I use. I have been glared at, threaten, and stopped just for using my pass. It is Against the Law for ANYONE other then a cop to ask me about my handicap. One girl even told me she would punch me in my face if I didn’t have a parking pass to use the space! The thing that blows me away is that even other disabled people will give me a hard time. I get no understanding at all. Do people really think that to be disabled you have to be old or use a wheelchair? It still seems no matter how sick those ppl are its still up to me to be the nice one, to not yell back bc of fear it could cause a physical fight (wich I would never win).  Guido my genreal reaction to people is to treat them as stupid as they act. They Clearly do not s they are rude and wrong. I kno it is Hard but try not to react in anger. I usually politely say it is against the law for anyone to ask me about my disability. If said person continues to push for information just tell them it is none of their business and walk away. They are ignorant remember that. 

  • Superwoolfy September 28, 2011

    wow I never knew that before. What is it about us disabled that people pick us out? It it just easier to to hurt the ‘weak’. Guido I understand where you are coming from. I am a young woman with fibromyalgia. To outsiders I look perfectly healthy yet, I have chronic pain. I have a parking pass wich I use. I have been glared at, threaten, and stopped just for using my pass. It is Against the Law for ANYONE other then a cop to ask me about my handicap. One girl even told me she would punch me in my face if I didn’t have a parking pass to use the space! The thing that blows me away is that even other disabled people will give me a hard time. I get no understanding at all. Do people really think that to be disabled you have to be old or use a wheelchair? It still seems no matter how sick those ppl are its still up to me to be the nice one, to not yell back bc of fear it could cause a physical fight (wich I would never win).  Guido my genreal reaction to people is to treat them as stupid as they act. They Clearly do not s they are rude and wrong. I kno it is Hard but try not to react in anger. I usually politely say it is against the law for anyone to ask me about my disability. If said person continues to push for information just tell them it is none of their business and walk away. They are ignorant remember that. 

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