Dispatches from Project Censored: On Media and Politics

Every two weeks one of Project Censored’s experts offers cogent analysis of the latest media industry news, the state of the free press, and the intersection of media and politics. Commentators include Nolan Higdon, author of The Anatomy of Fake News and national Project Censored judge; Mickey Huff, Project Censored Director; Andy Lee Roth, Project Censored Associate Director; and other critical media literacy scholars and independent journalists.

    By Nancy Kranich People have challenged books for centuries. But following the pandemic, newly formed parents groups such as Moms for Liberty grew to include more than 200 local chapters, which shifted their attention from opposing mask mandates and school closures to restricting reading materials in public schools and libraries. …

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  • By Mickey Huff and Nolan Higdon As we write for World Press Freedom Day, declared May 3, 1993, by the United Nations, Julian Assange of WikiLeaks languishes in Belmarsh prison awaiting possible extradition for trial in the US under the Espionage Act. His alleged crimes? Daring to publish evidence of …

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  • “University of Florida Eliminates all DEI-Related Positions,” read a March 2, 2024, New York Times headline. The article documented how Florida’s decision to terminate funds for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) related programs resulted in the University of Florida removing all DEI-related positions from their campus. This is but one …

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  • Op-Ed Abuse

    by Shealeigh

     By Mischa Geracoulis and Heidi Boghosian On September 21, 1970, the New York Times ran its first “op-ed” page. Short for “opposite the editorial,” this new feature provided space for writers with no relationship to the newspaper’s editorial board to express their views. Before long, other newspapers followed suit. More …

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  • By avram anderson and Shealeigh Voitl The Heritage Foundation’s Mandate for Leadership series began in 1981 following the 1980 presidential election, marking the beginning of the Reagan era. The 20-volume publication, totaling 3,000 pages, presented a series of policy proposals that the conservative think-tank believed would “revitalize our economy, strengthen …

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